Dispatches From the Front Lines of the Battle to Protect Workers: Short Stuff

In Memorium, Adrienne Markowitz: The health and safety movement has lost another of its legends. Adrienne Markowitz, former safety and health Director  of  the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Workers Union died of breast cancer last week. As her obituary describes  “She worked with, and for, the New Jersey teachers union, identifying threats from mercury,…

Dispatches From the Front Lines of the War On Worker Safety: Short Stuff

The Incredible Disappearing Security Breach: Hard to know what to say about this. Remember that alleged security “breach” in OSHA’s website that’s collecting injury and illness data from employers covered by OSHA’s recordkeeping requirements? That’s the same database that was supposed to be up in February, with a submission deadline of July 1.  It was…

Dispatches From the Front Lines Of Worker Safety and Health: Short Stuff

EPA Suffers From Shortage of Common Sense: Attorneys General from 11 states — New York, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington – have filed a lawsuit claiming that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt’s proposed two-year delay of the Accidental Release Prevention Requirements for Risk Management Programs is illegal under…

Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Battle for Workplace Safety and Health: Short Stuff

“We need to be protecting our workers as much as protecting our shores.”  So says former OSHA head Dr. David Michaels in response to a report by Reveal and PBS about fatalities and injuries at shipyards that receive billions in contracts from the US government. The reporters point out intentional, knowing violations of the law,…

Dispatches from the Front of the War on Worker Safety: Short Stuff

Major, Radioactive Oops:  More than 30 nuclear experts inhaled uranium after radiation alarms and ventilation systems at a Department of Energy weapons site were switched off.  The incident raises significant questions about safety in the nation’s premier nuclear labs: “not only were the labs’ procedures and responses riddled with errors, but even after attention was…

Save Harwood, War on Workers, War on the Earth: This Week’s Short Stuff

Save Harwood, Save Workers: The Trump Administration’s plan to scrap the Susan Harwood Worker Training Grant program has been getting a bit more negative attention. Some of the attention has come from Charles Davis at  ATTN,  mobile media platform for the young(er) folk. His piece, ‘Workers Are Going to Die’: The Overlooked Budget Cut That Could…

Lead Poisoning, Murder, and Trump’s Father-Daughter War on Workers: Short Stuff

Get the Lead Out: Joe Rubin at Huffington Post has a troubling story of how the California Department of Public Health failed to crack down on lead contamination at a firing range, or even refer the case CalOSHA despite serious worker overexposure and neighborhood contamination. Trump’s Impact on Public Safety: Former OSHA head David Michaels…

Exporting Cancer, Killing World Cup Stadium Builders and More Destructive Budget Cuts: Short Stuff for Your Reading Pleasure

Exporting Cancer and Miscarriages:  An upsetting but must-read article by Cam Simpson at Bloomberg Business Week looks at American semi-conductor companies who discovered in the 1980’s that chemicals they were using in the production of micro chips were causing cancer and reproductive problems in women working in their plants. So they did the honorable thing…

Some Bad New (about NY Dairy Workers), But Also Good News: Read All About It in Short Stuff

Milking the Workers? Farm worker advocates have published a survey of mostly undocumented Hispanic workers that describes discrimination and workplace abuse experienced by workers on New York’s large dairy farms. Most of the workers are undocumented. The authors report that nearly half of the workers said they were bullied or intimidated by their bosses, and two-thirds said…

Short Stuff: More Problems for Construction, Poultry Processing, Farms and Whistleblowers. So why doesn’t anyone want to work at DOL?

Do Not Pass go:  The New York Times reports that “the owner of two Brooklyn construction companies was charged with manslaughter on Wednesday because the authorities said he ignored complaints about a poorly maintained retaining wall that collapsed at a work site in 2015, killing an 18-year-old laborer and injuring two others.” Small Farms Don’t…