Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Battle for Workplace Safety: Short Stuff

Your job or you unborn child. Your job or your bladder. Your job or your life. These are the choices that far too many workers still have to make every day, in the 21st century, in the United States of America. Just got back from vacation and lots of troubling stuff has been happening while…

Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Battle for Workplace Safety: Short Stuff

OSHA: The Incredible Shrinking Agency: The number of OSHA inspectors has hit an all-time low according to data compiled by Bloomberg Environment Reporter Bruce Rolfsen. “The agency ended fiscal 2018 with 753 inspectors, compared to 860 at end of fiscal 2014, the personnel data, obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, show.” And that…

Dispatches From the Front Lines of the Battle for Workplace Safety: Short Stuff

Workers Can Participate in CSB Investigations: A major goal of the Occupational Safety and Health Act is to encourage workers to participate in the process, including allowing workers to walk around with OSHA inspectors. When the Chemical Safety Board was authorized, the law required that workers be given the same opportunity to participate in facility…

Dispatches from the Front Lines of Workplace and Environmental Safety: Short Stuff

The High Price of Clean Rooms: Thousands of Marriott hotel workers are on strike in 23 hotels in Detroit, Boston, San Diego, San Jose, Oakland, San Francisco, Maui, and Oahu. Aside from wanted a greater share of the company’s enormous profits, the hotel workers, represented by UNITE-HERE, are also demanding that the company address conditions that…

Dispatches From the Front Lines of the Battle for Workplace Health and Safety: Short Stuff

dispatches OSHA

The Little Program That Refuses To Die: OSHA announced its 2018 Susan Harwood Grant Awardees last week. This is the $10 million life-saving training grant program that the Trump administration (and Republicans in the House of Representatives try unsuccessfully to kill every year. Happily they’ve been unsuccessful, because the grants go to groups that provide…

Dispatches From the Front Lines of the Battle for Workplace Safety: Short Stuff

“They Treat Us Like Mules”: “They will break you down and then throw you away.” That’s what construction worker Ernesto Rivera told the Mike Elk at the Guardian about how construction workers are treated in Tennessee. Nashville is booming, but workers are paying the price.”In 2016 and 2017, 16 workers were killed on construction sites in…

Dispatches from the Front Line of the Battle for Workplace and Environmental Safety

See No Evil, Radiate No Evil: Nuclear safety advocate and form Department of Energy official Bob Alverez describes how Trump’s Department of Energy and Republican appointees on the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board—which oversees and reports on safety practices in the US nuclear weapons complex — is attempting to undermine the agency. With an annual budget…

Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Battle for Workplace Safety: Short Stuff

Poison Food, Poisoned Workers: Eyal Press of The Intercept writes about chronic health problems that have plagued Jessica Robertson since she began working as a  part-time U.S. Department of Agriculture poultry inspector at a turkey processing plant, most likely from peracetic acid which is used to remove bacteria from the carcasses of chickens and turkeys. USDA had ignored…

Dispatches From the Front Lines of the Battle for Workplace Safety: Short Stuff

Captives on the Kill Line:  Hiring immigrant workers — even undocumented workers — can be a headache. They get rounded up in immigration raids, move away or move on to better-paid jobs.  A much better and more profitable bet are prisoners on work-release. The Southern Poverty Law Center tells the story of one worker, Frank Dwayne…

Dispatches From the Front Lines of Workplace Health and Safety: Short Stuff

Criminal Conviction Upheld: DNRB, a Missouri warehouse construction contractor (doing business as Fastrack Erectors) was confirmed to be criminally liable for the fatal fall of an employee, according to the Eighth Circuit, affirming a previous guilty verdict. 22 year-old Eric Roach died July 25, 2014, after falling 30 feet from a building under construction. Roach…